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INDIANAPOLIS — Lavon Coleman, a Lompoc High and University of Washington graduate, performed well at the NFL combine on Friday.

Coleman bench pressed 225 pounds 23 times Friday. His vertical jump topped out at 33 inches. His broad jump was measured at 120 inches.

The running back checked in 5-feet-11 and a chiseled 223 pounds, then promptly ran a 4.65-second 40-yard dash.

The NFL has given Coleman a 4.98 grade, meaning he should be in an NFL training camp this summer.

The NFL.com draft profile also says Coleman is expected to be drafted in round six or seven, the final round.

"Coleman came from the high school of former Washington standout back Napoleon Kaufman (Lompoc, Calif.) and was a top-25 runner nationally, so expectations for him in Seattle were high despite the fact that he missed most of his senior year with injury," the draft profile read.

At Washington, Coleman redshirted in 2013 and was named Offensive Scout Squad MVP.

Coleman started two of the 11 games he played in 2014 (missing two with an injury), gaining 565 yards and scoring once on 138 carries (nine receptions, 35 yards).

"Though Coleman played in all 13 games as a sophomore, he saw the ball less often (33 carries, 176 yards rushing; four receptions, 31 yards receiving) and started just once, in the Heart of Dallas Bowl win over Southern Miss (six carries, 39 yards)," the profile continued. "The strong one-cut, north-south runner only had 114 carries in 2016, but he scored seven times and set a school record with 7.5 yards per attempt to get to 852 yards for the year (including 101 on 18 carries in Washington's win in the Pac-12 Championship Game).

"Coleman also won the team's Special Teams MVP for 2016 with seven tackles."

Colenman's 40 time was near the bottom of the pack for running backs, but his bench press was rated as a 'Star Performer' as the fourth best total for all backs.

Coleman's vertical was in the middle of the pack, as was his broad jump.

Oklahoma massive tackle historically bad at combine

INDIANAPOLIS — The only thing that's gone well for Oklahoma's massive tackle Orlando Brown Jr. this week is a vote of confidence from his Heisman Trophy-winning teammate.

"When are you ever going to watch Orlando Brown run 40 yards down the field?" quarterback Baker Mayfield asked Friday. "You can watch last year's tape and see he allowed zero sacks. I'd say that's pretty important for a left tackle."

It sure is.

But measures matter, too, and Brown's wretched week will undoubtedly stick in the minds of scouts, coaches and general managers leading up to the draft next month.

The nearly 6-foot-8, 345-pound left tackle managed just 14 reps on the 225-pound bench press Thursday, the lowest total of any lineman who has lifted at the combine this week.

That's tied for third-worst among offensive tackles since 2000, according to Pro Football Reference.

Things only got worse Friday for the son of former Browns and Ravens right tackle Orlando Brown .

He lumbered through the 40-yard dash in 5.85 seconds. Even by big O-linemen standards, that's sloth-like slow .

It's the fifth-slowest time by any player at the combine in the last 16 years, and none of the four who were slower were drafted or started a single game in the pros.

"I've been fat my whole life," Brown said earlier this week. "I wish I was fast."

Brown was projected to get drafted in the first couple of rounds, but his bad week in Indy could prove very costly.

His vertical jump was just 19 1/2 inches — nobody has ever gotten drafted with such a bad vertical jump — and his 6-foot-10 broad jump was off-the-charts bad, as well.

Historically, offensive tackles post a tad more than 25 reps in the bench press, run the 40-yard dash in 5.24 seconds and average 28.4 inches in the vertical jump and more than 8 1/2 feet in the broad jump.

He has another chance to impress at his pro day in a couple of weeks.

Last 2 Heisman winners face scrutiny over NFL futures

INDIANAPOLIS — Baker Mayfield and Lamar Jackson braced themselves for a long-anticipated flurry of questions at the NFL's annual scouting combine.

Even practice might not have prepared them for Friday.

The two Heisman Trophy-winning quarterbacks found themselves repeatedly talking about their biggest perceived weaknesses — Mayfield's size and brash personality and Jackson's future at quarterback. All they need to do now is convince pro scouts they're worthy of being first-round draft picks in April.

"I'm the most accurate quarterback in this draft for sure," said Mayfield, last year's runaway Heisman winner. "I'm ready to be a franchise guy."

Perhaps he will be the guy who turns around a struggling franchise, regardless of venue.

After all, Mayfield does possess the gaudy numbers, a multitude of honors and the winning resume pro teams covet in a starting quarterback. Mayfield went 33-6 as Oklahoma's starter.

What he lacks in size, standing a smidge over 6 feet, Mayfield makes up with a bold confidence and brash personality that ranks second to none.

The combination has occasionally led the blurring of lines between excitable celebration and unsportsmanlike conduct.

Those antics — the planting of the flag at Ohio State, the crotch-grabbing gesture at Kansas and the image of him running onto the field against Texas Tech, his former school, with a T-shirt reading "traitor" — have some NFL executives wondering how it would resonate in a locker room full of grown men.

Mayfield insists, though, he can change his actions.

"I'm up front and honest, brutally honest," he said. "Some people don't like that because it's rare these days."

But it's not just the on-the-field incidents that worry some.

Mayfield also was involved an embarrassing run-in with law enforcement officers in Arkansas last offseason and endured the humiliation of being stripped of his captain's title before his last home game at Oklahoma.

Teammates, however, have never wavered in their support.

"It's just really a perception," left tackle Orlando Brown Jr. said. "He's not the guy you think he is. He's a captain. He's a leader. He's very focused, and he's going to bring everyone together."

Jackson finds himself in a vastly different situation.

Despite having equally impressive stats, his own Heisman trophy and playing in an efficient spread offense, the questions about Jackson and former Ohio State star J.T. Barrett are all about fit.

Both were dangerous throwing and running in college, and history suggests the dual-threat quarterbacks either don't stick around long or stay healthy. Robert Griffin III and Tim Tebow are recent examples, which might explain reports suggesting Jackson will also work out with the receivers on Saturday.

Jackson repeatedly denied it.

"I thought I did a good job at quarterback (at Louisville). I did," he said. I'm here at the combine to show my ability. It (the talk) is just more motivation and I'm going to show them how good I am."

While Jackson has the numbers to prove his value at quarterback, Barrett's numbers suggest something else.

The only three-time captain in Ohio State history played on two Big Ten title teams, a national champion and was chosen the conference quarterback of the year three times. But his inconsistency frustrated fans and have scouts asking questions about his accuracy — and whether he's capable of being an NFL quarterback.

"I'm here to show 32 teams why they should draft me, and I think I can do that," Barrett said.

Mayfield has the most to gain or lose here.

If he can sell teams on his personality and that he can play more in the mold of other short quarterbacks such as Drew Brees and Russell Wilson, Mayfield's stock could soar and might push him into the top five or 10. If not, Mayfield could have a longer wait on draft day.

But nobody here believes more strongly in Mayfield than the Oklahoma quarterback. All you have to do is ask.

"I think if anyone is going to turn that franchise around, it would be me," Mayfield said when asked about going to the Cleveland Browns, who have No. 1 and No. 4 overall picks in April.

As for the height question, Mayfield cited some success stories before finishing: "If you want to see anything else, I've got three years of tape to prove it."

Notes: More than a month after Washington State quarterback Tyler Hilinski committed suicide, the Cougars' departing starter, Luke Falk, acknowledged he's still shaken by the event. "It's still just feels unreal. I know the guys up there are really doing a lot of team activities and trying to come together," Falk said. "But I don't think we'll ever get over it. It's always going to be with us. Tyler is always going to be with us. Hopefully a lot of good comes from it. Tyler will always be a part of us."

AP source: Dolphins agree to acquire Rams' Robert Quinn

MIAMI — The Miami Dolphins can't wait to improve their pass rush.

Miami agreed to acquire Los Angeles Rams edge rusher Robert Quinn for a mid-round draft pick, a person familiar with the deal said Friday. The person confirmed the agreement to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity because under NFL rules, no 2018 trades can be completed until March 14.

Quinn has 62½ career sacks, including 8½ last year, when he started 14 games. He spent his first six NFL seasons with the Rams at end but played outside linebacker last season.

Quinn is expected to bolster a Dolphins pass rush that was disappointing in 2017. They had 30 sacks, tied for sixth fewest, and ranked fifth worst in opposing passer rating, which helped explain their 6-10 record.

Miami's other defensive ends include 36-year-old Cameron Wake, Andre Branch and 201 first-round draft pick Charles Harris.

Quinn, the 14th pick of the 2011 draft, made the Pro Bowl in 2013 and 2014. He struggled with injuries in 2015, eventually having season-ending back surgery, and a concussion limited him to nine games in 2016.

He's due a base salary of $10 million this year and is under contract through 2019.

— The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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Joe Bailey is the sports editor at Lee Central Coast Newspapers. Contact him with tips and story ideas at jbailey@leecentralcoastnews.com or (805) 739-2239. Follow him on Twitter at twitter.com/jbaileysmsports

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Sports Editor

Alumni Fresno State