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Biden repeated his false claim that he opposed the war in Iraq from the moment the war began.

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Stand clear, someone is lasering through the side of your cell block. When the wall cuts free, you see a friendly Resistance face telling you to hurry. They're here to rescue you.

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Editor's note: David G. Allan is the Editorial Director for Features at CNN and has nurtured a lifelong devotion of Star Wars that he has carefully indoctrinated in his children, one of whom he brought to opening day of Star Wars: Galaxy's Edge.

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In this examination of the final year of the Civil War, writer Gwynne wraps together the stories of black soldiers in the Union Army, Missouri's guerrilla war, the surrender at Appomattox and the assassination of President Lincoln. (Scribner; Oct. 29) 

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On June 4, 1944, U.S. forces were able to capture a German submarine off the African coast because they had broken the Enigma code and learned a sub was in the vicinity. On the eve of D-Day, the U.S. couldn’t risk that the Germans would realize the code was cracked. So they hid away the sub and its captured crew until the end of the war, and the Germans assumed the vessel was lost at sea.

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In a 1964 interview, Dwight Eisenhower said a single person “won the war for us.” He was referring to Andrew Higgins, who designed and built the amphibious assault crafts that allowed the Allies to storm the beaches of Normandy. The eccentric boat builder foresaw not only the Navy’s acute need for small military crafts early on, but also the shortage of steel, so he gambled and bought the entire 1939 crop of mahogany from the Philippines. His New Orleans company produced thousands of boats for the war effort.

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TRUMP: "Our brave troops have now been fighting in the Middle East for almost 19 years."

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The U.S. military says a number of service members were killed Wednesday in an explosion while conducting a routine patrol in Syria — the first instance of U.S. casualties since President Donald Trump announced his intention to withdraw troops from the country last month.

"Rampage: MacArthur, Yamashita, and the Battle of Manila" by James M. Scott; Norton (640 pages, $32.95) ___ Gen. Douglas MacArthur considered the Philippines' capital of Manila to be his home, the place, he writes, where "My mother had died, my wife had been courted, my son had been born." In the years before World War II, Manila, under American rule, was known as the Pearl of the Orient, a ...

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  • 4 min to read

When U.S. forces and their Afghan allies rode into Kabul in November 2001 they were greeted as liberators. But after 17 years of war, the Taliban have retaken half the country, security is worse than it's ever been, and many Afghans place the blame squarely on the Americans.

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"Rampage: MacArthur, Yamashita, and the Battle of Manila" by James M. Scott; W.W. Norton (640 pages, $32.95) ___ It's hard to imagine that a major monthlong battle from World War II - one that devastated a large city, caused more than 100,000 civilian deaths and led to both a historic war crimes trial and a Supreme Court decision - should have escaped scrutiny until now. But history has ...

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