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This undated photo shows a rosemary plant, left, and a Bay Laurel, right, in New Paltz, NY. Rosemary is an herb ideal for growing on a windowsill in winter, provides aroma, flavoring and beauty. (Lee Reich via AP)

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This image provided by the American Folk Art Museum shows the Hudsonian Curlew weather vane. The museum's curator, Emelie Gevalt, said one of her favorite pieces in the exhibit is the museum's own "Hudsonian Curlew." The 1874 piece is large, nearly 7 feet tall and 4 feet wide. A relatively simple design, it depicts the body and distinctive curved beak of the shorebird in gold-leafed sheet metal, and once sat atop the Curlew Bay sportsmen's club in Seaville, New Jersey. (John Bigelow Taylor/American Folk Art Museum via AP)

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This image provided by the American Folk Art Museum shows a Dove of Peace weather vane. "Dove of Peace" is loaned by the Mount Vernon Ladies Association to the American Folk Art Museum for an exhibit on weather vanes. It was commissioned by George Washington, an amateur meteorologist. He asked Mount Vernon's architect, Joseph Rakestraw, to design the dove-shaped weather vane with olive branches in its mouth. (Gavin Ashworth/ American Folk Art Museum via AP)

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This image provided by the American Folk Art Museum shows a copper fox weather vane. Perched atop churches, barns, businesses, homes and seats of government for hundreds of years, weather vanes have taken the form of everything from farm animals to pets, storybook figures to race cars. They were invented for one important job: telling which way the wind was blowing. Gradually, they became appreciated as an art form. (Richard Goodbody/American Folk Art Museum via AP)

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This image provided by the American Folk Art Museum shows a Touring Car and Driver weather vane. Perched atop churches, barns, businesses, homes and seats of government for hundreds of years, weather vanes have taken the form of everything from farm animals to pets, storybook figures to race cars. They were invented for one important job: telling which way the wind was blowing. Gradually, they became appreciated as an art form. (Adam Reich/American Folk Art Museum via AP)

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This image provided by the American Folk Art Museum shows the Archangel Gabriel weather vane. Perched atop churches, barns, businesses, homes and seats of government for hundreds of years, weather vanes have taken the form of everything from farm animals to pets, storybook figures to race cars. They were invented for one important job: telling which way the wind was blowing. Gradually, they became appreciated as an art form. (George Kamper/American Folk Art Museum via AP)