Search / 5 results found

from
to
  • Updated

If Emily Blunt could give advice to her younger self just getting a SAG card, she would tell her younger version to not watch too many movies.

  • Updated

John Krasinski's celebrated mostly-silent horror sensation "A Quiet Place" got only one nomination, and a curious one at that, for Marco Beltrami's score of all things. Krasinski was expected to be a bigger player, for director (his debut), screenwriting, and even acting alongside his wife Emily Blunt, who did get her own best actress nomination for "Mary Poppins Returns."

  • Updated

Director John Krasinski's third feature, and by far his most accomplished, "A Quiet Place" is a pretty crafty small-scale thriller set a few years in the future, with minimal dialogue and maximal, human-eating monsters. The creatures' origin is never discussed or explained by way of the usual sheepish exposition about a meteor or some garden-variety bio-disaster. Produced by Michael Bay, the movie takes them for granted, and then goes about figuring a vanquishing plan. It's a survivalist's dream: living off the grid, close to the land, home-schooling the kids, no modern culture or digital distractions to corrupt anyone's wits. The prologue sets the stakes good and high. Mother Evelyn (top-billed Emily Blunt) has ventured into the decimated town with her husband, Lee (Krasinski, Blunt's husband in actual life) and their three children. A few minutes later, in a swift, violent flash, one is gone. I don't know if I'd call "A Quiet Place" enjoyable; it's more grueling than cathartic. But the upbeat, can-do shotgun-blasting climax gets the crowd going. 1:35. 2 1/2 stars. -- M.P.