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A major change in the weather pattern will occur Sunday as the high-pressure system responsible for the northeasterly Santa Lucia winds and hot air temperatures breaks down in response to an early season low-pressure system.

This low-pressure system and associated cold front will bring increasing northwesterly winds and much cooler temperatures to Central Coast on Sunday through Tuesday.

The cold front may be strong enough to produce party cloudy skies with pockets of drizzle or light rain showers Monday. It may also be cold enough to produce a dusting of snow across the higher terrain of the Sierra Nevada.

Another passing trough could spread showers across far Northern California from Wednesday into Thursday, with temperatures warming slightly along the Central Coast and night and morning marine low clouds with areas of fog and mist from Wednesday through Friday.

Santa Ynez Temperatures

Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun

50/79 50/82 50/85 52/82 56/83 53/85 54/84

Santa Maria Temperatures

Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun

54/72 55/71 52/75 51/70 56/75 55/78 54/78

Lompoc Temperatures

Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun

54/71 55/72 52/73 51/73 56/74 55/74 54/75

Seawater Temperatures

Pacific Ocean water temperatures will range between 56 and 59 degrees.

Surf Report

Increasing northwesterly winds off our coastline will generate a 4- to 6-foot northwesterly 310-degree, deep-water sea and swell, with a 7- to 12-second period, Saturday into Wednesday.

A 6- to 8-foot west-northwesterly 285-degree, deep-water swell, with a 16- to 18-second period, from the Gulf of Alaska could arrive along our coastline Sept.23, which coincidently is the start of fall.

Your Weekly PG&E Safety Tip

Be prepared for stormy weather by having battery-operated flashlights and radios ready with fresh batteries to listen for updates on storm conditions and power outages.

Also keep a standard land-line telephone or fully charged cell phone ready as a backup in case the power fails.

Freeze plastic containers filled with water to make blocks of ice that can be placed in your refrigerator during a power outage, then open the refrigerator door as little as possible to prevent food from spoiling.

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John Lindsey is Pacific Gas and Electric Co.’s Diablo Canyon Power Plant marine meteorologist and a media relations representative. Email him at pgeweather@pge.com or follow him on Twitter @PGE_John.

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