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How California could count every vote faster | CalMatters

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Election workers sort ballots at the Sacramento County voter registration and elections office in Sacramento on Nov. 8, 2022. 

For more than a week after the Nov. 8 election, control of the U.S. House of Representatives remained undetermined. All eyes had turned to more than half a dozen uncalled races in California when, on Wednesday, the Associated Press projected victory for Rep. Mike Garcia in his Los Angeles-area district, finally handing Republicans a slim majority in the new Congress.

As tense days ticked by without resolution, political pundits across the country once again lamented why the vote count takes so long in California, while conservatives resurfaced concerns that late-arriving ballots and slow results exposed Democratic efforts to steal close races.

In reality, the extended count, which will take a month to finish, is a consequence of California’s shift to overwhelmingly voting by mail, a convenience that requires several additional steps of verification by local officials once ballots arrive.

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Felicia Gold casts her ballot at the California Museum on Nov. 8, 2022.

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Alicia Little, an election services specialist, tests the logic and accuracy of an accessible voting machine called ICX at the Contra Costa County Elections Department on Sept. 30, 2022. 

This article was republished with permission from CalMatters.  Read more of their coverage of California state government on CalMatters.org

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