Dear Abby: Blind date begins love story that has lasted 55 years
Dear Abby

Dear Abby: Blind date begins love story that has lasted 55 years

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DEAR ABBY: I met my lady on a blind date many years ago. When I knocked on the door, it opened and this beautiful girl was standing there. Thinking I could never be so lucky, I asked, "Is your sister home?" No. She was my date.

We dated for a few months, fell in love and got married. We have had a wonderful 55-year marriage, and it gets sweeter every day. We handle different opinions with courtesy and respect.

I'm 81 now, and hugging and kissing her fills my heart with warmth and happiness. The greatest joy in my life is to love and be loved. I wish everyone the same. -- ECSTATIC IN NEW JERSEY

DEAR ECSTATIC: Congratulations on 55 years of happiness. Thank you for sharing your love story with my readers and me. Today, I wish them -- and you and your lovely wife -- a very Happy Valentine's Day.

DEAR ABBY: My sister recently self-published a book that purportedly honors my mother's service in World War II. Her book is completely inaccurate. It is filled with romantic fantasy and historical errors, and cheapens my mother's real service with untruths.

My sister is now busy selling and promoting the book with interviews and book signings. My mother, if she were still alive, would be embarrassed and appalled. I don't want to cause a family feud, but I feel if I remain silent, I'm helping to perpetuate something that is wrong on multiple levels. What, if anything, should I do? -- READING A LOT INTO IT

DEAR READING: I am sure your late mother was an amazing woman whose story didn't need embroidering. It may be a blessing she isn't around to see what your sister has done to it. Because the book is now in print, it's too late to "stop the presses." If you try to discredit what was written, it will very likely cause a rift, and I don't recommend it. Wish your sister luck and cross your fingers that it won't become a bestseller.

DEAR ABBY: My brother lives in another state. He was never a good brother. He has always been self-centered, controlling and condescending. He is no longer in good health. Some time ago, he named me as his power of attorney for financial and health issues. I am elderly and have my own issues, so, should the need arise, it would be difficult for me to travel to where he is.

He has never been open, so I don't know who his health care providers are, who his banker or investment people are, etc., so, even if I were to go, I'd have no idea where to start to act on his behalf and according to his wishes. I don't even know what his wishes are, for that matter.

Because of his caustic personality, he has few friends and no family of his own. How do I resign as his power of attorney so there is no assumption by anyone that I would be a responsible party for him? -- UNABLE IN THE WEST

DEAR UNABLE: Discuss this with your attorney to be sure you have all your i's dotted and your t's crossed. Then write your brother a letter. Explain that because you have no information about his doctors, his wishes about end-of-life planning, his banker or investment adviser -- plus the fact that your own health isn't the greatest -- you hereby resign as his power of attorney. Send the letter via registered mail so he will have to sign for it, and there will be proof that your brother received it.

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DEAR ABBY: I need some help. A terrible car accident happened in front of my house a few months ago that resulted in the death of a husband and father. The family comes out every Sunday to place flowers at the accident site, which is my front yard. At first, I had no problem with them expressing their grief and tried to console the widow every time I saw her. The problem is, she has gradually added to the area a memorial stone, an angel statue, vases and some of her husband's belongings. My front yard is beginning to look like a graveyard -- a tacky one.

DEAR ABBY: My husband and I are friendly with two other couples whose children are friends with ours. We live in a fairly small community, and the couples met and began socializing because my husband and I introduced them. It started out with board game nights, progressed to potlucks and holiday events, then eventually a three-family summer vacation. Everyone seemed to get along fine.

DEAR ABBY: I've got a new one for you. My beautiful 16-year-old daughter was interested in a boy her age from school. He was interested in her, too. He told her he wanted to date her, but that he is "polyamorous" and would be dating many girls simultaneously. She told him he's too young to know what he is yet, and he was just using it as an excuse to date multiple girls, and she wasn't interested.

DEAR ABBY: My husband and I have an elderly (90-plus) aunt who lives with her son in a town about four hours away. She corresponds by letter with us regularly, and we always write back. However, it has become apparent that she's not receiving our letters because she doesn't make any comments on any of the things we write to tell her about. We suspect that her son is withholding her mail because we have written to him in the past to express our displeasure about how he treats his mother's emotional and safety needs.

DEAR ABBY: I have never been in love before, and I have just learned the man I'm seeing is a former felon. It was nothing having to do with sexual violence or killing anyone. I'm afraid if my family finds out, they will judge him. He works seven days a week and lives in a shelter because most places don't want to rent to felons. He treats me good and takes me out for dinners.

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